The Happiness Inquiry

A teacher's quest to cultivate happy habits in her students

The documentary is here!

2 Comments

Greetings, patient and loyal subscribers!

It took a bit longer than expected, but I am so pleased to announce that The Happiness Inquiry is complete and up on YouTube for your viewing pleasure. It was shown to many of the middle school students at my school last week and I was very proud of their responses to it. I’m interested in any and all feedback you might have after watching, and I hope you find it interesting or even inspiring!

Without further ado…

The Happiness Inquiry

Author: henrykat

I am a middle school special education teacher in Chicago. I was fortunate enough to receive a Fund for Teachers grant that allows me to spend a month in Denmark, considered to be the happiest place on earth. I hope to use my experience to inspire my students to make choices that will increase their personal sense of well being.

2 thoughts on “The documentary is here!

  1. Fascinating stuff. It’s intimidating how their proficiency in English is better than many native speakers here in the U.S. Was this level of English competency as common as I remember? The answer to how to be happy is obviously to live in Denmark where the social safety net gives you the security to try different things. Without student loans to worry about, young people (or even mid-career job switchers) can take their time and figure things out. How homogeneous is their country/culture these days? Immigrants/refugees have radically changed the culture in other parts of Europe, but I’m not sure about Denmark. Plus Aarhus may be different because it’s in the country vs. Copenhagen. We’ll have to discuss all of this in more detail some day.

    Love, Uncle Todd

    • Hey Uncle Todd!
      Glad you thought the movie was interesting! True, they are very well spoken, though you know how it is when someone learns a language secondarily–it always sounds more proper/formal and less colloquial, which I think can have it’s charms (love ebonics, for example). I thought another takeaway was listening to your mind and your body and try to be more present, which is harder to do in a culture that works far more hours, but might be more attainable if we try to be more intentional. I also think there’s more preoccupation with upping the ante all the time around here, while in Denmark I found a lot of people who were satisfied when they had their basic needs met and we’re always hunting for promotions and raises and that sort of thing. I need to look into their cultural makeup for sure–that is a common and important question!

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